Daily TIP

The Daily TIP: Abbas Tells Fatah that He Rejects U.S. Peace Plan, Will Continue Paying Martyrs

Posted by Tip Staff - July 09, 2018

Abbas Tells Fatah that He Rejects U.S. Peace Plan, Will Continue Paying Martyrs
KLM, Austrian Airlines Canceling Flights to Iran Amid Diplomatic Disputes
Anti-Semitic Attacks Reported over the Weekend in Germany and Switzerland
Israeli Trained Team in Japan Assists with Relief Following Heavy Rainstorms, Flooding


Abbas Tells Fatah that He Rejects U.S. Peace Plan, Will Continue Paying Martyrs

During a meeting with Fatah party leaders on Sunday, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said that Palestinian terrorists and their families will continue to receive stipends and that Arab countries agree with him in opposing the United States peace plan, The Times of Israel reported.

During the meeting, Abbas indicated that the Palestinian government will continue to disburse money to their “martyrs and prisoners and wounded people,” something it has done in its various incarnations since 1965.

It has been estimated that stipends amount to 7 percent of the PA’s 2018 total budget.

During the meeting, the Palestinian leader also discussed the U.S. President Donald Trump’s Israeli-Palestinian peace plan and said that those efforts are destined to fail. He also added that other Arab countries have rejected the peace plan, though he did not specify which countries.

The meeting comes in the wake of PA officials attacking Trump’s plan, saying that it is an attempt to “blackmail” Palestinians to “liquidate” their cause. PA Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah previously said that the U.S. threatening to cut funding to the PA was “extortion.”

The PA has characterized recent U.S., Israeli and international efforts to help improve the quality of life of the Palestinians in the Gaza Strip as being focused on dividing the Palestinians.

For instance, Abbas "rebuked" United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, Nickolay Mladenov for his efforts to promote humanitarian and economic projects in Gaza saying that they were “in harmony with American schemes.”



KLM, Austrian Airlines Canceling Flights to Iran Amid Diplomatic Disputes

Both KLM, Royal Dutch Airlines, and Austrian Airlines have announced that they are cancelling flights to Iran, Benjamin Weinthal reported for The Jerusalem Post. The announced cancellations, which are to take place in September, come at a time that the home countries of both airlines have ongoing diplomatic disputes with Tehran.

KLM announced Saturday that it would suspend direct flights to Tehran. A statement from the airline said, "“As a result of the negative results and financial outlook for the Tehran operation, the last flight will take off from Amsterdam on September 22, 2018 and land at Schiphol on September 23.”

Last week, it was announced that the Netherlands had expelled two Iranian diplomats two months ago. Iran's Foreign Ministry recently announced that it had summoned the Dutch ambassador and conveyed to him that the expulsion was “unfriendly and nonconstructive," and that Iran could choose to retaliate.

Though the Dutch government has given no reason for the expulsions, an Iranian-Arab separatist was killed in the Hague last November. Iran, in the past, has been implicated in the murder of political opponents on foreign soil.

Austrian Airlines also announced that it would be cancelling flights to Shiraz and Isfahan, but continuing its flights to Tehran, as Austria and Iran are also involved in a diplomatic dispute.

Austria has insisted that the Iranian ambassador lift the immunity of a diplomat, Assadollah Assadi, who was arrested in Germany, in connection with a planned bombing of a Paris conference sponsored by opponents of the current Iranian regime.



Anti-Semitic Attacks Reported over the Weekend in Germany and Switzerland

Several violent anti-Semitic attacks took place over the weekend in Berlin and Zurich, The Jerusalem Post reported Sunday.

Three Germans and six Syrians were taken into custody on Saturday for allegedly assaulting a Syrian Jew in a park in Berlin’s Mitte district. The 19-year-old victim, who was wearing a Star of David, told authorities the suspects shouted “anti-Semitic insults,” beat him, and pulled a cigarette from his mouth. He had to be hospitalized.

In the Swiss capital Zurich, a German man threatened three Orthodox Jews with a knife. Local newspapers reported the perpetrator shouted anti-Semitic abuse. The man was stopped by a bystander and was detained by Swiss police.

The incidents were the latest in a series of anti-Semitic attacks, which have rocked European cities in recent months.

A Syrian immigrant was sentenced in June by a court in Berlin to a four-week jail term for an anti-Semitic attack on an Israeli man and was ordered to undergo Holocaust education.

In March, 85-year-old Shoah survivor, Mireille Knoll, was stabbed to death and her body burned by her neighbor in Paris. Last year, a man shouting “Allahu akhbar” beat up Jewish schoolteacher Sarah Halimi and threw her to her death out of her Paris apartment window.

According to the annual “Antisemitism Worldwide” report by the Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry at Tel Aviv University, released in April, the “most disturbing” element of the study was “the prevalent ominous feeling of insecurity among Jews in Europe.”



Israeli Trained Team in Japan Assists with Relief Following Heavy Rainstorms, Flooding

A three-person emergency response team is being deployed today by Japan IsraAID Support Program (JISP), the Japanese branch of IsraAID: Israel Forum for International Humanitarian Aid, to the Okayama prefecture in western Japan where the heaviest rainfall in decades has caused flooding, landslides and loss of life.

More than 95 fatalities have been reported, dozens are missing and two million people displaced from their homes. The JISP team will distribute urgent relief items, assess immediate medical and post-trauma psychosocial needs and provide psychological first aid and mental-health support to evacuees.

Yotam Polizer, IsraAID’s co-CEO, explains that an IsraAID team arrived in Japan four days after the 2011 tsunami and is still there today providing post-trauma capacity-building, psychosocial and mental-health support and leadership training for youth.

In 2013, IsraAID established JISP, which is led by Tohoku-based disaster professionals. JISP has responded in partnership with IsraAID to earthquakes and flooding in southern Japan and Nepal, and supported IsraAID’s refugee programs in Kenya, with significant funding from the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“JISP’s emergency responders arriving in Okayama tonight are all Japanese professionals from the area affected by the 2011 tsunami,” Polizer tells ISRAEL21c. “They have been to Israel and received training and support for the past seven years. Our goal was to have the local capacity to respond. It’s sad to test it in these circumstances but we are glad to have this capacity.”

(via Israel21c)


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