Daily TIP

The Daily TIP: TIP CEO: Moving Embassy to Jerusalem Would Show that Israel’s Security is “Non-Negotiable”

Posted by Tip Staff - October 25, 2017

TIP CEO: Moving Embassy to Jerusalem Would Show that Israel’s Security is “Non-Negotiable”
Israelis Work with Jordanians, Palestinians in EU-Sponsored Disaster Training Drills
BBC Charges Iran with “Campaign of Intimidation and Harassment” Against Its Staff Members
Israeli Professor Leads Int'l Project to Compile Most Complete Catalog of Reptiles on Earth


TIP CEO: Moving Embassy to Jerusalem Would Show that Israel’s Security is “Non-Negotiable”

If President Donald Trump makes good on his promise to move the United States embassy to Jerusalem, this would demonstrate support for Israel and show "Israel’s enemies that the security of the Jewish state is non-negotiable for Washington," Josh Block, president and CEO of The Israel Project wrote in an op-ed published Tuesday in The Algemeiner.

Block observed that Trump visited Israel over the course of his first trip abroad as president and that his visit coincided with the 50th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem in 1967.

The Jerusalem, Trump saw, Block noted, "is a vibrant, modern, thriving city," and “is the perfect capita

l.” What’s missing from Jerusalem though “are the embassies of other nations to the state of Israel.”

As a candidate, Trump promised to change that situation, but earlier this year he signed a waiver keeping the embassy in Tel Aviv.

After signing the waiver, Trump told former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee that he wanted to try peacemaking between Israel and the Palestinians before moving the embassy.

Trump, Block wrote, "seems to have fallen victim to the persistent myth that the chances for peace would be undermined by affirming Israel’s sovereignty in Jerusalem." Moving the embassy, Block argued, would also show the Palestinians "that unilateralism will no longer be rewarded, and that the only acceptable path forward is genuine peace negotiations." Moving the embassy to Jerusalem would also be an acknowledgment of the "continuous Jewish presence in Jerusalem for three millennia.”



Israelis Work with Jordanians, Palestinians in EU-Sponsored Disaster Training Drills

Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian firefighters along other emergency personnel participated in a two-day training exercise, which was sponsored by the European Union, on how to respond to natural disasters, The Times of Israel reported Wednesday.

The multinational exercise, which was based in Israel, had teams of emergency workers battling the effects of simulated forest fires and earthquakes.

The simulated forest fire "broke out" across Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Jordan, and firefighting teams from all three governments, aided by firefighters from Spain, Italy and France, attempted to contain it. The different teams also shared their techniques and cooperated during the exercise.

“The scenario is that a large fire breaks out and develops into a regional disaster. The blaze is then joined by additional disasters, going from one country to its neighbor,” Israel's Foreign Ministry explained in a statement.

In a different exercise, simulating an earthquake, rescue teams from Israel, the PA, Jordan, and Spain, practiced rescuing people from rubble at an army base in southern Israel.

"It’s a huge exercise,” said Lt. Col. Shlomi Ben-Yair, commander of the IDF Home Front Command’s Ram Battalion, which participated in the exercise. “We are practicing every aspect of a disaster.”

Of the more than 400 participants, half were from Israel. Jordan sent aircraft to fight fires, dozens of rescuers, firetrucks, and medical personnel. The PA sent firefighters and firetrucks. The European countries sent firefighters, medical teams, and firefighting planes to the exercises. Spain also sent search and rescue teams.



BBC Charges Iran with “Campaign of Intimidation and Harassment” Against Its Staff Members

The BBC has reported Iran to the United Nations for a “sustained campaign of intimidation and harassment”, after Iranian authorities launched an investigation into more than 150 of its staff for "conspiracy against national security."

The Daily Telegraph reported Wednesday that the broadcaster, in a complaint to David Kaye, the UN special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of expression, accused the Iranian government of a systematic campaign designed to pressure journalists to cease working for the BBC.

“The Iranian government is conducting what appears to be a politically motivated investigation into 152 BBC Persian staff, former staff and contributors, accusing them of conspiracy against national security in Iran. This is an unprecedented collective punishment of journalists who are simply doing their jobs," said Tony Hall, director general of the BBC, in a statement.

He continued, "This is not just a campaign against BBC Persian staff but against fundamental human rights, and the BBC calls on the government of Iran to end this legal action immediately.”

The broadcaster further noted that former and serving staff had been subject to intimidation tactics by Iranian state agencies, such as unlawful detention and interrogation of relatives and friends, including children. They also falsified allegations of sexual misconduct.

The BBC Persian service is banned in Iran and broadcasts from London. It reaches a Persian-speaking audience of some 12 million people around the world. Like other branches of the BBC World Service, it is funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.



Israeli Professor Leads Int'l Project to Compile Most Complete Catalog of Reptiles on Earth

An international project initiated by an Israeli professor has resulted in the most comprehensive catalog and atlas of every reptile on Earth, including 10,000 species of snakes, lizards, and tortoises and nearly 32,000 land vertebrate species altogether.

An international team of 39 researchers worked on the new “Atlas of Life,” as described in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

The atlas links the new reptile information with existing maps for birds, mammals and amphibians. The resulting information provides a missing piece to the puzzle of global conservation planning and prioritization.

“Mapping the distributions of all reptiles was considered too difficult to tackle. But thanks to a team of experts on the lizards and snakes of some of the most poorly known regions of the world, we managed to achieve this, and hopefully contribute to the conservation of these often elusive vertebrates that suffer from persecution and prejudice,” said Prof. Shai Meiri, the Tel Aviv University zoologist who first planned and has been leading the project for the past 10 years.

Tel Aviv University, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology all had representatives on the research project.

According to lead author Uri Roll, a fellow in desert ecology at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev’s Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, “Lizards typically tend to have weird distributions and often like hot and dry places, so many of the newly identified conservation priority areas are in drylands and deserts.”

(via Israel21c)


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