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The Daily TIP: SFSU President: Professor's Anti-Zionist Views "Contrary" to School's Value of Inclusion

Posted by Tip Staff - March 28, 2018

SFSU President: Professor's Anti-Zionist Views "Contrary" to School's Value of Inclusion
Watchdog Group: Bombs Disguised as Rocks in Yemen Suggest Iranian, Hezbollah Aid for Houthis
PA Defies U.S. Again: New Budget Allocates Millions for Terrorists
Trove of Ancient Coins Discovered, Attesting to Jewish Life in Jerusalem 2,000 Years Ago


SFSU President: Professor's Anti-Zionist Views "Contrary" to School's Value of Inclusion

The president of San Francisco State University (SFSU) asserted that the anti-Zionist views of a professor expressed on the official Facebook page of one of the school's programs were "contrary" to the university's values in a letter published at their website Monday.

President Leslie Wong of SFSU allowed that the professor, Rabab Abdulhadi, was entitled to her own opinion but expressing that cannot be done "in a way that implies university endorsement or association."

In a public e-mail responding to the concerns of 60 campus-oriented and faith-based organizations, California State University Chancellor Timothy White expressed his support for Wong's "corrective action," however he acknowledged, "it is not yet clear whether this faculty member will comply with the request."

The matter was brought to the attention of the university by the AMCHA Initiative, an organization that fights anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism on campus.

As of this writing, the offending post remains up at SFSU's Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas (AMED) Studies Facebook page.

White further asserted that should the professor not comply, "the University will explore all appropriate options with respect to this conduct."

In February, reacting to remarks by Wong, Abdulhadi wrote on her Facebook page, "I consider the statement below from President Wong, welcoming Zionists to campus, equating Jewishness with Zionism, and giving Hillel ownership of campus Jewishness, to be a declaration of war …” She then shared the post and an accompanying graphic on the Facebook page of SFSU’s AMED program.

Watchdog Group: Bombs Disguised as Rocks in Yemen Suggest Iranian, Hezbollah Aid for Houthis

A new report says roadside bombs disguised as rocks in Yemen bear similarities to others used by Iran’s terror proxy Hezbollah in southern Lebanon and by insurgents in Iraq and Bahrain, the Associated Press reported Monday.

The study by Conflict Armament Research comes as the West and United Nations researchers identified Iran as supplying arms to Yemen’s Houthis, a Shiite rebel group which has held the country's capital since September 2014.

Those weapons allegedly included ballistic missiles used to target Saudi Arabia. On Sunday, Houthi rebels fired a barrage of seven ballistic missiles at the kingdom, killing one person and wounding two.

The independent watchdog said it examined a fiberglass-encased bomb, packed with explosives, and found a type of Chinese-manufactured wire covering used in other Iranian materiel.

The group further reported that drones used by the Houthi rebels to crash into Patriot missile batteries in Saudi Arabia share “near-identical design and construction characteristics” of Iranian drones.

This is not the first time Iran has been accused of arming the Houthis. The United States Navy’s 5th Fleet, based in Bahrain, has repeatedly said Iran sends arms into Yemen. From September 2015 through March 2016, they intercepted four Iranian smuggling vessels that yielded in total more 5000 AK-47 rifles, 80 antitank guided missiles as well as machine guns and sniper rifles, according to data released by the U.S. Navy.

In December 2016, Conflict Armament Research published another report in which it accused Iran of smuggling weapons to Houthi rebels.



PA Defies U.S. Again: New Budget Allocates Millions for Terrorists

Just days after the United States Congress passed the bipartisan Taylor Force Act into law, the Palestinian Authority published its 2018 budget, which includes $355 million allocated to payment of terrorists and their families, Palestinian Media Watch reported Wednesday.

The Taylor Force Act would reduce U.S. aid to the PA by the amount the PA pays terrorists and their families after taking into account payments made for water, childhood vaccination programs, and certain Palestinian hospitals.

According to PMW, which reviewed the budget, the payments for terrorists and released terrorists amount to 550 million shekels ($158 million) and the payments to families of "martyrs," those killed or wounded while committing or attempting to commit acts of terror against Israelis total 687 million shekels ($197 million). The funds designated for terrorists or their families come to a sum of $355 million.

The family of Bashar Masalha, who killed Taylor Force will receive these funds.

This is not the first time that the PA has defied U.S. demands to stop encouraging terror with what has become known as the "pay to slay" program.

After Masalah killed Force, PA President Mahmoud Abbas refused to condemn the attack, and the Fatah party, which is headed by Abbas, termed Masalha a "martyr," facilitating the payment of PA funds to his family.

Since becoming president last January, President Donald Trump asked Abbas to stop encouraging terror, and Abbas refused to cooperate.



Trove of Ancient Coins Discovered, Attesting to Jewish Life in Jerusalem 2,000 Years Ago

A trove of rare bronze coins, the last remnants of a four-year Jewish revolt against the Roman Empire, has been discovered in a cave near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

During the digs at the Ophel excavation site, led by Hebrew University archaeologist Eilat Mazar, dozens of coins as well as broken pottery vessels, jars and cooking pots were found dating back to the Great Revolt period (66-70 CE).

It is believed that these 1.5 cm bronze coins were left behind by residents of Jerusalem who hid in a 7-by-15-meter cave for four years during the revolt – from the Roman siege of Jerusalem until the destruction of the Second Temple and the city of Jerusalem. The coins are well preserved, which Mazar says is because they were only in use for a short time.

The majority of the coins are from the final year, known as “Year Four” (69-70 CE). While coins from the earlier years of the revolt were inscribed “For the Freedom of Zion” (in Hebrew), those from Year Four were inscribed “For the Redemption of Zion.”

“A discovery like this — ancient coins bearing the words ‘Freedom’ and ‘Redemption’ — found right before the Jewish Festival of Freedom, Passover, begins is incredibly moving,” Mazar said.

The coins are decorated with Jewish symbols including the four plant species associated with Sukkot: palm, myrtle, citron and willow; and a picture of the goblet used in the Temple service.

(via Israel21c)


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