Daily TIP

The Daily TIP: New York Times Op-Ed by Iran’s FM Refuted by Paper’s Reporting

Posted by Tip Staff - December 11, 2017

New York Times Op-Ed by Iran’s FM Refuted by Paper’s Reporting
Bahraini Interfaith Group Visits Israel at Behest of King to "Send a Message of Peace"
UK's Foreign Secretary Unable to Secure Release of Dual National, Iran Seeks Ransom Payment
Israeli Organization Wins Prize for Innovative App that Cuts Down on Rescue Response Time


New York Times Op-Ed by Iran’s FM Refuted by Paper’s Reporting

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif asserted that during nuclear talks in 2005 "Britain, France and Germany suddenly demanded that we abandon all enrichment activities" after which "the talks fell apart," in an op-ed published Monday in The New York Times, a recollection that does not match the paper's reporting twelve years ago.

Zarif was referring to the Paris Agreement of November 2004. Iran then agreed to suspend all enrichment activity in exchange for "economic and political incentives," while the two sides engaged in talks about Iran's nuclear weapons program, as the Times reported at the time.

But in August of 2005, when France, Britain, and Germany made an offer, according to the Times, "to provide Iran with economic, technological, security and political incentives if it permanently abandoned its conversion and enrichment activities." Iran rejected the European proposal stating that it did not meet its "minimum expectations," and resumed enriching uranium.

In other words, the EU3 did not bring up the terms "suddenly" but rather as part of ongoing talks, and those talks didn't "fall apart," but Iran ended them unilaterally.

The foreign ministers of the EU3 subsequently confirmed in an op-ed, published in The Wall Street Journal, "Last month, Iran decided to defy the international community by restarting uranium conversion at its plant in Isfahan, a unilateral step halting our talks."The contemporaneous reporting shows that Iran brought sanctions upon itself by insisting that it had a right to enrich uranium despite a long record of nuclear cheating.



Bahraini Interfaith Group Visits Israel at Behest of King to "Send a Message of Peace"

A delegation of religious figures from the Gulf kingdom of Bahrain, sent by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, arrived in Israel this week “in order to send a message of peace,” The Times of Israel reported on Sunday.

It is extremely rare for representatives from Arab countries with which Israel maintains no formal diplomatic relations to visit the Jewish state and is further evidence of the normalization process between the two nations.

The Bahraini delegation, which is made up of 24 members of the “This is Bahrain” group, is in Israel for a four-day visit with the mandate to foster a climate of religious tolerance between people of different faiths. On their website, the group states its commitment to a vision of “religious freedom and peaceful co-existence where we all live together in harmony in the spirit of mutual respect and love.”

A Shiite cleric on the trip told Hadashot TV news that “The king sent us with a message of peace to the whole world.” The cleric said that Shiites, who make up a majority of the Sunni ruled country, do not harbor hatred against Jews or members of any other faiths.

Bahrain, like Israel, is extremely alarmed by Iran’s hegemonic ambitions and Bahraini officials have stated their desire to establish ties between Jerusalem and Manama to help contain the Islamic Republic’s influence in the region.



UK's Foreign Secretary Unable to Secure Release of Dual National, Iran Seeks Ransom Payment

Returning from a trip to the Middle East including a stop in Iran, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said that it was "too early to be confident" that a British-Iranian dual citizen would be released by Iran before Christmas, even as evidence emerged that Iran is seeking what is effectively a ransom payment for her release.

Johnson said that he had spoken to Iranian officials about releasing Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who was arrested as she was preparing to leave Iran after visiting family there, The Independent reported Monday. She was subsequently sentenced to five years in prison for attempting to overthrow the government.

Addressing the case of Zaghari-Ratcliffe, Johnson told the MPs, "I urged their release on humanitarian grounds, where there is cause to do so."

Johnson's failure to obtain Zaghari-Ratcliffe's release comes at a time that Saeed Ghasseminejad noted that Iran's military has an item in the budget for allocating $571 million, roughly the amount Iran claims that the UK owes to cover a canceled arms deal following the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Iran's Ambassador to London Hamid Baeedinejad claims that the UK is planning to transfer the sum to Iran's central bank in the coming days.

In circumstances similar to Zaghari-Ratcliffe’s the U.S. government paid $1.7 billion that Iran said it was owed due to a canceled arms deal at the same time Iran released five Americans it had arrested. Though the U.S. government denied it, an Iranian general characterized the payment as ransom for the Americans taken hostage.



Israeli Organization Wins Prize for Innovative App that Cuts Down on Rescue Response Time

United Hatzalah founder and president Eli Beer received the Conference of European Rabbis’ second-place prize for innovative technology during the Slush Conference in Helsinki on November 30, 2017.

CER prizes are awarded annually to three individuals or organizations whose technological innovations are making a better world for all of humanity. This year, more than 400 applicants vied for the honor.

Beer accepted the award for United Hatzalah’s Moskowitz LifeCompass, a tracking app that dispatches volunteer EMS personnel based on their proximity to the scenes of medical emergencies.

“We created our app before smartphones existed based solely on GPS technology,” Beer said. “Through utilizing the application we have been successful at dramatically cutting down EMS response time to less than three minutes countrywide and helping to treat more than 2.5 million people in the past decade.”

The app — first in the world to apply advanced GPS tracking technology to the field of EMS — gets its name from Florida supporters Cherna Moskowitz and her late husband Irving. “They supported the development of the technology from its infancy and saw it grow into what it is today, one of the most advanced EMS dispatching systems in the world,” said Beer.

The Slush Conference is an entrepreneurial social networking platform started by students to facilitate founder and investor meetings in an effort to build a worldwide startup community. It is active in northern Europe as well as China, Japan, and other parts of eastern Asia.

(via Israel21c)


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